EDM, Studio and Art History Faculty:


Molly Emma Aitken

Assistant Professor

Molly Emma Aitken is Assistant Professor of Asian Art. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 2001 with a concentration on the art of South Asia. She has curated traveling exhibitions on South Asian jewelry and contemporary folk quilts, and has published numerous articles on Mughal and Rajput painting. Her book publications include When Gold Blossoms: Indian Jewelry from the Susan L. Beningson Collection (Philip Wilson, 2004) and The Intelligence of Tradition in Rajput Court Painting (Yale University Press, 2010). Aitken has explored feminist approaches to South Asian art, questions of interpretation, contextual studies, problems of Occidental conceptual taxonomies in non-western studies and the possibilities for formal analysis and connoisseurship in contemporary art history.


Colin Chase
Associate Professor

Colin Chase is a sculptor who uses a variety of materials and devices to encourage contemplation. Ideas, forms, textures, synergistically juxtaposed and nestled in incongruent combinations which challenge formal spatial logic, as well as quick intellectual responses. He is represented by June Kelly Gallery in New York. His work has been included in one person and group exhibitions in several galleries including Jamaica Arts Center, Socrates Sculpture Park, The Studio Museum in Harlem, and the Neuberger Museum of Art. He is a former resident of the Institute for Contemporary Art, P.S. 1 Museum and Longwood Studios. He received public commissions from the Queens Hospital and the Malcolm X Memorial.


Marit Dewhurst
Visiting Assistant Professor

Marit Dewhurst is the Director of Art Education and Visiting Assistant Professor in Art Education. She received her doctorate in education from Harvard University in 2009 where she worked on the intersection of activist art-making and social justice education. She has worked as an educator and program coordinator in multiple settings both nationally and abroad including community centers, museums, juvenile detention centers, and international development projects. Most recently, she founded and coordinated The Museum of Modern Art’s free studio arts programs for teens. Publications include chapters in several books on the use of art in social justice education and articles in The Journal of Art Education and The Journal of Research Practice. In addition, she has co-curated an exhibition on traditional art and HIV/AIDS education with partners at The Michigan State University Museum. Her research and teaching interests include social justice education, community-based art, youth empowerment, and the role of the arts in community development both locally and abroad.


Megan Foster
Lecturer

Megan Foster Megan Foster received a BFA at the Rhode Island School of Design in 2000 and an MFA from Columbia University in 2002. She has an extensive background in traditional and digital printmaking techniques. She has worked as a master printer for artist such as Kara Walker, Kiki Smith, Sarah Sze and Barnaby Furnas. Megan has had solo exhibitions of her paintings and prints in many galleries within the US and in Europe.


Leopold Fuentes
Assistant Professor


Susan Elizabeth Gagliardi
Assistant Professor

Susan Elizabeth Gagliardi is a specialist in West African art history. She received her Ph.D. in Art History from the University of California at Los Angeles after conducting extensive fieldwork in Burkina Faso and Ghana. Her most recent research focuses on power associations, the great patrons for the arts in Senufo- and Mande-speaking towns across western Burkina Faso and southern Mali. Gagliardi examines the arts, knowledge, and interpersonal networks power associations promote. She considers how power association leaders, artists, patrons, and audiences shape and respond to dynamic arts and performances. She also investigates diverse strategies for assemblage and tensions between the seen and unseen dimensions of the visual arts. To support her work, she has earned Fulbright-IIE and Fulbright-Hays fellowships as well as fellowships from the National Museum of African Art (Smithsonian Institution), the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (National Gallery of Art), and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.


Ellen Handy
Associate Professor


Craig Houser
Lecturer

Craig Houser has a B.A. in art history from Carleton College, an M.A. from Hunter College, and an M.Phil. from the CUNY Grad Center. His scholarship focuses on modern and contemporary art in relationship to issues related to gender and sexuality, as well as institutional and social politics. He also has substantial experience working in museums as a curator and educator. He was a curatorial fellow in the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program and an assistant curator at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. In addition, he was also an editor for College Art Association, which publishes The Art Bulletin and Art Journal. Houser’s publications include Rachel Whiteread: Vienna Holocaust Memorial, in Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art (University of California Press) and The Changing Face of Scholarly Publishing: A History of CAA Publications, in The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: The College Art Association and the Visual Arts since 1911 (Rutgers University Press).


Anna Indych-López
Associate Professor

Professor Indych-López received her Ph.D. in Art History in 2003 from The Institute of Fine Arts of New York University. She specializes in the modern art of Latin America, specifically Mexico, Mexican Muralism, and the reception of Mexican modernity in the United States in the 1930s. Her work focuses on institutional critique, cross-cultural perceptions, reception analysis, and post-colonial theory. Her first book, Muralism without Walls: Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueiros in the United States, is forthcoming with University of Pittsburgh Press in their new series “Illuminations: Cultural Formations of the Americas.” She teaches graduate courses on Euro-American modernism, the modern art of Latin America, the contemporary art of Latin America, and the modern art of Mexico.


Lise Kjaer
Lecturer


Sylvia Netzer
Professor

Sylvia Netzer has had several recent one-person exhibitions: Disturbing, 2003, Appetites, 2004, and Hopeful Monsters, 2007. She has participated in many group shows, including the Fat Attitudes show at Columbia University, the encaustic exhibition at William Paterson College, and the auction for the Watermill Center for Arts and Humanities. She had a residency at the Glen Gerry Brick factory in York, Pennsylvania in 2006, and in 2007 she co-curated an exhibition, Women Touch: Ceramics at A.I.R. Gallery. She also curated several shows at Gallery 128 on the Lower East Side and at A.I.R. Gallery and was included in “One True Thing” at the A.I.R. and Putney School, Vermont, curated by Dena Muller. She was twice-nominated for a Louis Comfort Tiffany grant, 2005 and 2007, and for the annual exhibition of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, 2006. She teaches courses in all areas of ceramics, on the graduate and undergraduate levels.


Ina Saltz
Professor

Ina Saltz works primarily in print-based media design with a specialization in typography and publication design. Her creative work is primarily photographic and written documentation of the cultural phenomenon of textual tattoos with respect to their typographical significance and the relationship of type and image. She also writes on a variety of design-related topics for several professional graphic design journals. She is the author of Body Type [2006] a photography book documenting typographic tatoos.


Harriet Senie
Professor

Harriet F. Senie is director of the MA program in museum studies and teaches the required museum studies seminars in that area. She is the author of The ‘Tilted Arc’ Controversy: Dangerous Precedent? (2002), Contemporary Public Sculpture (1992), and co-editor of Critical Issues in Public Art (1992; 1998), as well as numerous articles and essays on public art, memorials, and audience response. She is currently working on a book tentatively titled Transforming American Memorials: From Symbolic Cemetery to a Light in the Sky: Vietnam to 9/11.


Tom Thayer
Lecturer

Tom Thayer’s work lyrically combines elements frail and feeble in nature, crudely parroting reality, in an effort to reveal the poetry that underlies our own existence. His ideas are realized through a variety of media and activities including paintings, drawings, sculptures, film performance and work- shops. His artworks and performances have been exhibited at The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, The Living Theater, New York, BBC Radio 3, London, and numerous other national and international venues. He teaches Painting/Diverse Media at the City College of New York.